Congenital Hemophilia A and B

Congenital hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by an absent or reduced level of clotting factor VIII (8) or factor IX (9). In a person with normal amounts of clotting factors, when bleeding starts, all of the clotting factors work together to form a clot that stops the bleeding. People with hemophilia (PWH) are missing or have reduced amounts of one of these important clotting factors so bleeding continues until they receive treatment. Learn More

 


Acquired Hemophilia

Congenital Hemophilia is an inherited (genetic) bleeding disorder caused by a missing or reduced levels of one of two protein, clotting factors VIII (8) or factor IX (9). In a person with normal levels of clotting factors, when an injury occurs, all of the clotting factors work together to form a clot that stops the bleeding. People with congenital hemophilia are born without enough of one of these important clotting factors so bleeding in them continues until treatment is given. Patients with none or reduced factor VIII have congenital hemophilia A (“classic” hemophilia) and those with none or reduced factor IX are known as congenital hemophilia B (Christmas Disease). Learn More

 


Congenital Factor VII Deficiency

Your body takes a series of complex steps to stop bleeding. It begins with blood vessels constricting (narrowing) and platelets forming a plug in the vessel wall where it is injured. This starts a process called clotting, in which a group of proteins works (referred to as factors) work together to create a firm blood clot. The process of forming a blood clot involves a series of steps that result in a net like structure called fibrin. This net makes the blood clot stable and stops the bleeding until the vessel wall can heal. Learn More

 


Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia

Your blood contains small, sticky cells called platelets. When you cut or injure a blood vessel and begin to bleed, platelets rush to the site of injury. There, they stick to the blood vessel and try to stop the leak. They also send out a chemical signal that attracts other platelets. Then, those platelets stick to the platelets at the injury site to form a plug that stops the bleed. Learn More

 


Congenital Factor XIII Deficiency

Your body takes a series of complex steps to stop bleeding. It begins when small blood vessels called capillaries are injured, resulting in vessel constriction and formation of a platelet plug at the site of injury. This triggers a process called clotting, in which a group of proteins, or factors, work together to create a firm blood clot. This process results in a protein called fibrin. Fibrin then forms strands that link together, much like a net weaving in and around the platelets. This net makes the blood clot stable and stops the bleeding until the vessel wall can heal. Learn More